NCCE #ResearchBytes

Very pleased to have contributed to the current #ResearchBytes newsletter from the National Centre for Computing Education

Insights
Developing computing pedagogy post-2014: a doctoral study
Dr Elizabeth Hidson, Senior Lecturer in Education,
University of Sunderland, UK
As a former ICT teacher who stepped out of school to study for a doctorate in 2014, the ICT to Computing curriculum change was an obvious area of research for me. ICT teachers already in post were now teaching computing, and the expectation was that they were finding pragmatic ways to work within the new curriculum.
I undertook some in-depth case study research into how teachers across England researched and planned their lessons. Most of these planning sessions were observed via desktop-sharing in Skype, making it possible to watch and listen while a teacher located and modified resources, discussed their approaches, or grappled with subject knowledge deficits while teaching themselves a new programming technique before introducing it to their students. Lesson planning like this would normally have remained largely hidden, but the study highlighted it conceptually and methodologically as a promising area for future research. One example of this could be researching new approaches to developing programming pedagogy to track the development of pupils’ computational thinking.

I found that participating teachers demonstrated a range of practical and useful approaches to planning Computing lessons under the new PoS, and the approaches were much more focused around collaboration and communities of practice than anticipated. The way that participant teachers worked to locate, use, and modify teaching resources led me to the conclusion that the resources themselves had real potential for the sharing of pedagogical approaches. Developing teaching resources and sharing them is a way to share good practice, but it is also a way to use and share the theoretical approaches that underpin planning.

I used Shulman’s (1986, 1987) frameworks of pedagogical reasoning and Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) in order to have a language with which to describe the pedagogical practices I observed as teachers planned lessons. One of the long-standing critiques of ICT as a subject has been that it was under-theorised and overly skills-driven. As the new Computing curriculum continues to be embedded in England, being able to ascribe shared meaning to what practitioners say and do is important, especially as some of their practices, such as lesson planning, are carried out in isolation. Subject knowledge exchange is needed, but so is pedagogical knowledge — not just what to teach, but how and why, as well as what the best teaching methods are.

Using the language of pedagogy to discuss, plan, and share resources and approaches is important for making classroom practitioners integral to building collective understanding of the professional knowledge and skills needed to shape the subject as it develops.

Next steps:Choose an activity or lesson that you are confident with and share it with a peer: discuss with them how you teach the concepts and why you do it that way. A great place to do that is your local CAS community, or online via #caschat.Read Elizabeth’s full thesis.

Professional Crossroads and Identity Crises: Finding My Tribe

First published on the ITTE website 09/05/2019

I skim-read a random post on Facebook recently that said something along the lines of, if you want to know who you are, look around at your friends – you are the average of your five closest friends. Any switched-on practitioner with a bit of research savvy is going to look at that and make a noise like ‘pfft’ and keep scrolling. Think back to the misuse of Dale’s Cone, or any of the educational neuromyths that continue to maintain a hold in CPD sessions and you get the sense of how I responded to that. However, in several recent discussions, I have come to realise that there may be a grain of truth in this in relation to the professional identity of those of us whose work in education involves technology.

I can remember back in the late 90s trying to explain to my grandmother what a PGCE in IT was. She was very pleased that I was training to be a teacher, but had no concept of IT. The best I came up with was that I taught people how to use computers. Woefully inadequate, but strangely indicative of the identity crisis that has haunted the profession all this time, and never more so than the last five years.

Photo Credit

IT became ICT 1999 into 2000. The beginning teachers on my PGCE course joked that as we would graduate with PGCEs in Information Technology, we were not qualified to teach the new subject “ICT”. Shift forwards to the infamous 2012disapplication of ICT speech at BETT, followed by the 2014 curriculum change and there were some very wobbly moments as in-service ICT teachers faced the challenge of upskilling to teach Computer Science. This is an issue close to my heart and formed the core of my own doctoral research, where I looked at teachers’ perceptions of this change and how they were responding in terms of their teaching.

I stepped out of school to study for my doctorate in 2014, and so, no longer technically a teacher, let alone an IT, ICT, Computing or Computer Science teacher, I came adrift from my former Personal Learning Network, not that we really called it that in years gone by. Studying and working in educational research, I encountered a whole new tribe of teachers-who-research. At WIPCSE 2015 I metCraig Jenkins and spoke to him about a presentation he had given at ITTE2015and from there, I joined ITTE, gave my first Pecha Kucha at ITTE2016 and they haven’t been able to get rid of me since!

ITTE is the association behind the respected Technology, Pedagogy and Educationjournal, and I feel a real sense of professional kinship with this group of teachers, teacher educators, academics and researchers, who recognise the value that each aspect of our identities brings to the work that we do. More importantly, they provide a space and time to come together as a community, welcoming contributions from everyone for whom technology, pedagogy and education are pillars of their practice.

Join us this year on 11th and 12th July in Winchester and be part of the conversation about a richer curriculum and how to create a culture of opportunity in a digital world.


Video in Language Teacher Education

Imagine my surprise when I was trying to find a link to something I knew was online – I typed my name and up popped the Warwick University page on Video in Language Teacher Education (ViLTE), with one of my papers!

Naturally, I was pleased that my work was being shared. I’m a video person rather than a languages person, but having worked extensively with linguists at Newcastle University, there has always been a crossover. Video-enhanced observation formed a key part of my work on the VEOEuropa project and the proPIC project.

Link to ViLTE

Video is a key interest of mine – in practice and in research. It’s also an area I will be contuining to work on in the future.

Firsts…

No photo description available.
First journal article in print to land on the doormat!

This is quite a proud moment – my first journal article, online since January, has landed in print version on my doormat!

Video-enhanced lesson observation as a source of multiple modes of data for school leadership: A videographic approach

Hidson, E. (2018). Video-enhanced lesson observation as a source of multiple modes of data for school leadership: A videographic approach. Management in Education, 32(1), 26-31. Also available from: https://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/10034/